Tag Archives: Blurring Of Boundaries

Trouble at the Border?: Gender, Flexibility at Work, and the Work-Home Interface – Schieman & Glavin

Drawing on data from the United States, this paper explores issues around autonomy and schedule control in the workplace.

It demonstrates that schedule control increases both the frequencies of bringing work home and work contact outside of normal working hours. This is especially the case for men. For both men and women, job autonomy is associated buy levitra now with more work being brought home. For men only, job autonomy is associated with increased work contact.

Schedule control and job autonomy also have implications for role-blurring and work-family conflict: work contact is positively associated with work-family conflict among individuals with low job autonomy, while bringing work home is associated positively with work-family conflict among individuals with greater schedule control.

Schieman, Scott; Glavin; Paul (2008) “Trouble at the Border?: Gender, Flexibility at Work, and the Work-Home Interface” Social Problems, 55(4)

Available at: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/sp.2008.55.4.590

Verschwimmen die Grenzen? Auswirkungen von Vertrauensarbeitszeit auf die Schnittstelle von Arbeit und Privatleben – Janke et al.

This article demonstrates that the blurring of boundaries between work and private life is asymmetrical. It notes that work is integrated much more into private life than vice versa.

This is despite employee preference for keeping their work out of their buy 40 mg levitra private lives.

The authors approach this issue by looking at overtime, organizational culture and autonomy.

Janke, Ines; Stamov-Roßnagel, Christian; Scheibe, Susanne (2014) “Verschwimmen die Grenzen? Auswirkungen von Vertrauensarbeitszeit auf die Schnittstelle von Arbeit und Privatleben” Zeitschrift für Arbeitswissenschaft, 68(2)

Available at: http://www.zfa-online.de/

In reality new ‘flexible working rights’ could mean longer days and less family time

WAF Project Principal Investigator Heejung Chung on how flexible working may prove to be a ‘honey trap’ to lure workers into a ‘job that never ends’.

Flexible working time, once a perk for successful professionals, has gone mainstream. From June 30, the right to request flexible working will be extended to all workers in the UK. In a time where most benefits are being cut rather than expanded, this is a remarkable policy development. Continue reading